In search of an ‘England’s past for everyone’ in Ilfracombe, Devon: a digital history and heritage project

By Andrew Jackson Issue 17, Summer, 2007 pp.32-34. Andrew Jackson looks at some of the work of the Victoria County History (VCH), and their project in Ifracombe in north Devon. The group launched the ‘Devon’s History and Heritage’ project 100 years after the Devon volume of the VCH was first published. The new project explored different ways to approach Devon’s history by utilising image analysis and oral history.   17… Continue reading In search of an ‘England’s past for everyone’ in Ilfracombe, Devon: a digital history and heritage project

Speaking in the Vernacular: History and Academic Video

In 1966, the collieries of the Somerset Coalfield were declared unprofitable and closed. The closure resulted in the loss of nearly four-hundred jobs and left a void in the community that had been built around the mining industry. The Radstock museum of the Somerset Coalfield created a Video Archive which took the form of a compilation of memories from the elderly Somerset mining community. Following its success, Tim Bateman makes a case for academic videos as a medium for presenting history. Bateman reimagines the potential for video history outside the parameters of television and film entertainment.

The Museum of Bristol and its public

'The Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery is a much-loved Bristol institution containing collections of national status alongside local treasures. But though its visitors often linger at Ernest Board's grand 1930 painting of Some Who Have Made Bristol Famous, the museum as a whole does not focus on the city's own history. Certainly, the lives of ordinary Bristolians have yet to be represented and as a buoyant market rewrites the city's topography, there is a real need to historicise Bristol's urban spaces'. In this article, Dresser looks at the plans to open a museum which fills the gaps left my Bristol Museum and Art Gallery.

Regional Historian Report on the Museum of Bristol Meeting

How much has the history of ordinary Bristolians been portrayed in the city’s Museums? Blaise House, it is true has some charming material about childhood and rural life and the Industrial Museum does look at the history of the industrial and port work force. Temporary exhibitions at the Bristol Museum and Art Gallery have also, at times, attempted to widen their usual focus on the Great and the Good. But these exceptions only prove the rule. For the most part, the lives of the mass of the city’s inhabitants, and the way the city itself has evolved —has been ignored.