William Gilbert in Bristol: from Asylum to Hurricane

William Gilbert was a Romantic poet best known for writing ‘The Hurricane’ in 1795. The motivations behind writing the visionary poem can be traced back to Gilbert’s time in an asylum in Hanham, South Gloucestershire. John Henderson, son of the asylum proprietor Richard Henderson, introduced Gilbert to the study of astrology and provided care. Paul Cheshire's article provides an insight into Gilbert’s life in Bristol and his time in the asylum. 

“The poor do not need long epitaphs”: the provenance of some West Country memorials

An epitaph may be defined as something written about the dead. Often epitaphs found on gravestones and memorials are wholly or in part some fitting quotation or poem which, from the perspective of the bereaved, seems to befit the departed. In this article, Michael Weller explores the provenance of those epitaphs found on gravestones of south west England, and the very different form of writing found on memorial plaques and the like

‘Natural Fire’ and the Idyls of Labour: a socialist poet in nineteenth Century Bristol

By Gerrard Sables Issue 17, Summer, 2007 pp. 35-38. Devon-born poet and bootmaker, John Greggory, was a beloved member of the socialist community in Bristol. In this article, Gerrard Stables follows the story of Greggory’s life and traces his connections to the Chartist, Socialist and Trade Unionist movements of Bristol. Throughout his life, Greggory’s poetry evolved and naturally became evermore connected to the social causes which he fought for.  17 - Gerrard Sables:… Continue reading ‘Natural Fire’ and the Idyls of Labour: a socialist poet in nineteenth Century Bristol