Aftermaths of war: Bristol in three civil defence plans, 1939-1967

"Three civil defence exercises covering Bristol – in 1939, the 1950s and 1960s – not only have an eerie fascination for their word-pictures of a city plunged into imaginary wars; the written scenarios also throw light on what concerned the scenario writers. As the likely damage in war became more than the authorities could handle, so the planners’ responses took a sinisterly authoritarian turn"

‘Natural Fire’ and the Idyls of Labour: a socialist poet in nineteenth Century Bristol

By Gerrard Sables Issue 17, Summer, 2007 pp. 35-38. Devon-born poet and bootmaker, John Greggory, was a beloved member of the socialist community in Bristol. In this article, Gerrard Stables follows the story of Greggory’s life and traces his connections to the Chartist, Socialist and Trade Unionist movements of Bristol. Throughout his life, Greggory’s poetry evolved and naturally became evermore connected to the social causes which he fought for.  17 - Gerrard Sables:… Continue reading ‘Natural Fire’ and the Idyls of Labour: a socialist poet in nineteenth Century Bristol

Invoices from the Past: The household expenses of a farming family in early 19th century Wiltshire

The Wiltshire and Swindon Record Office is home to a remarkably complete collection of invoices from two branches of the Pyke family of nineteenth century Wiltshire. This article highlights just how much information can be drawn from a simple source like a bill or a voucher. Through these sources, archivist Steven Hobbs provides a window not only into the household economy and estate expenditure of the two farms, but also into the local community. A full spectrum of local trades and skilled workers are revived in this short article, along with information about the kinds of products that were available in nineteenth century Wiltshire.

The Port of Bristol and the Interwar Recession

Frank Smith looks at the impact of the interwar recession on the port transport industry in Bristol, as well as looking at comparisons with the two major ports in London and Liverpool. The article follows the fluctuation of unemployment and industrial relations in the aftermath of the conflict, as well as looking at the way the city accommodated the various changes.