The Lower Severn Vale: Trade and Exploration in Tudor Times

"Bristol, the Lower Severn Vale, the Severn Estuary and the Atlantic Ocean are all closely connected by trade. Liz Napier paints a vivid picture of port life in Tudor Bristol and the beginnings of international trade from original records".

Tales of the Vale: The ‘A Forgotten Landscape’ History Research Project – Introduction

"A Forgotten Landscape is an exciting project designed to reconnect local people with their heritage in the Lower Severn Vale Levels. One strand of this Heritage Lottery Fund Landscape Partnership Project is a community history project called Tales of the Vale". Bainbridge introduces the project, and how it interprets the landscape of the South West.

Bristol’s War at Sea

This article is about how Bristol's involvement in each of the World Wars affected the atmosphere in the city, especially as a port city it played a key role in proceedings with supply transportation. Furthermore, Byrne emphasises the effect that the German U-Boats had, providing an invisible enemy to be wary of whilst the city played its part in bolstering the war effort.

Community Capitalism and the Governance of Victorian Bristol

"The phrase ‘community capitalism’ was coined by Charles Harvey and John Press: Before 1914, there existed in Bristol a close knit business community with a commitment to the economic well-being of the city. The leaders of this community– men like Sir George White, Albert Fry, Christopher Thomas and Joseph Wethered – formed an economic elite with powerful social and political connections. They jointly promoted many companies, held many directorships,and controlled a large number of major enterprises. This was not so much family capitalism as community capitalism".

Aftermaths of war: Bristol in three civil defence plans, 1939-1967

"Three civil defence exercises covering Bristol – in 1939, the 1950s and 1960s – not only have an eerie fascination for their word-pictures of a city plunged into imaginary wars; the written scenarios also throw light on what concerned the scenario writers. As the likely damage in war became more than the authorities could handle, so the planners’ responses took a sinisterly authoritarian turn"

A Shining Wedge of Water: The Battle for Bristol’s City Docks, 1969-1975

"One of the things that every civic-minded Bristolian ‘knows’ is that at some point in the 1960s or 70s the City Council planned to cover over or fill in the Floating Harbour". Eugene Byrne sheds light on the effort to save such an important part of the historical landscape in Bristol.

The Rise and Fall of ISC Chemicals at Avonmouth: The Impact of the Montreal Protocol on CFCs

In this article, Bingham looks at the implementation of the Montreal protocols, and its efforts to phase out chlorofluorocarbons, a key part of the economics of the chemicals part of the Avonmouth munitions plant site. It also explores the impact of one of the most important factors; the 1987 Montreal Protocol which led to the complete phasing out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which had by then become an important part of the economics of the chemicals part of the site. Was it inevitable that the site would close, or did other factors contribute to its demise?

The Port of Bristol and the Interwar Recession

Frank Smith looks at the impact of the interwar recession on the port transport industry in Bristol, as well as looking at comparisons with the two major ports in London and Liverpool. The article follows the fluctuation of unemployment and industrial relations in the aftermath of the conflict, as well as looking at the way the city accommodated the various changes.