Constructing a rail ferry across the Severn: 1845-68

"In the 1800s the pursuit of profit resulted in better wharves and plans for bridges and tunnels to bring coal from Wales. Adam Mead reminds us of the failures and financial losses involved in constructing Victorian marvels of engineering which we take for granted today".

‘In Proud and Loving Remembrance’: The Ashley Down Boys School War Memorial

"The ubiquity of war memorials can lead to them being taken for granted as part of our everyday landscape. Ashley Down Boys School was one of many Bristol schools that memorialised men after the war. The school’s records and the histories of the men who died can be used to examine the motivations behind remembrance, particularly in the decade after the war. By considering the original story of the placing of such a memorial we are able to reconnect to the initial impetus behind such commemorations; the simple desire to remember the sons and brothers lost in the conflict and the need to effect reconciliation with grief so those left behind could carry on with their lives".

Aftermaths of war: Bristol in three civil defence plans, 1939-1967

"Three civil defence exercises covering Bristol – in 1939, the 1950s and 1960s – not only have an eerie fascination for their word-pictures of a city plunged into imaginary wars; the written scenarios also throw light on what concerned the scenario writers. As the likely damage in war became more than the authorities could handle, so the planners’ responses took a sinisterly authoritarian turn"

Sir Richard Berkeley: An Elizabethan Career

'Sir Richard Berkeley, a harasser of smugglers at home and a schemer at court, was arguably one of the most politically astute landowners of the Elizabethan age. Here, Tony Nott profiles the complex political and diplomatic career of the first builder of Stoke House.

Glass Mill, Ashley Vale, 1528-1898 : notes on its history and its contribution to local history – and several outstanding questions

The existence of Glass Mill is still recorded on the street plan of Bristol by a 'mill pond' at the northern, dead, end of Mina Road. Alongside it is now a pumping station which continues to supply water to the city from the brooks which have fed both mill and the town for hundreds of years. Ward discusses its contribution to local history, as well as other relevant questions that have materialised.