Elmington Manor Farm: 1584-1911

"Elmington Manor Farm is the best-documented farm in the Lower Severn Vale Levels, which is why James Powell chose as his topic 'The Estate Management of Elmington Manor Farm and environs 1066-1950'". From sources in "public archives, planning departments, libraries and museums" Powell looks at the earliest records of the farm, and how it survived to be surveyed by the "Second World War Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries".

Aftermaths of war: Bristol in three civil defence plans, 1939-1967

"Three civil defence exercises covering Bristol – in 1939, the 1950s and 1960s – not only have an eerie fascination for their word-pictures of a city plunged into imaginary wars; the written scenarios also throw light on what concerned the scenario writers. As the likely damage in war became more than the authorities could handle, so the planners’ responses took a sinisterly authoritarian turn"

The Norman Lords of Bristol

"The early history of Bristol is obscure. Although archaeological excavation is beginning to shed light on the development of the town, the townsmen left no written records to provide a picture of the political framework, within which the town emerged, nor of how power was mediated in the town". Thompson looks at early records of how Bristol was formed, and what events and factors influenced its early development.

Remarks on Two Prints: The ‘View of the Entrance to the Lower St. James’ Arcade, Bristol’ and the ‘Interior of the Upper St. James’ Arcade’.

These two delightful prints portraying the Upper and Lower St. James’s Arcades in Broadmead seem particularly appropriate for inclusion, in this issue of The Regional Historian,since they are from the Braikenridge Collection the subject of Sheena Stoddard’s new book reviewed here. They celebrate too the luxurious properties of glass - a subject discussed in Sue Gordon’s article on the Bristol glass industry.