The Surgeon and the Lunatics

"Nineteenth century commentators on mental illness were often fascinated by the outward signs of difference between sane and insane behaviour, and the relative changes brought about in each patient’s demeanour and expression by treatment in the asylum. As Michael Whitfield finds here, these interests could be as common in the newspaper press as they were amongst surgeons".

Charles Houlden Walker, 1776-1844, Attorney and Publicist

"John Lyes considers the career of an overlooked Bristol lawyer and finds him to have been a feisty and prolific criminal justice campaigner... Walker was also a regular writer of letters to the local press". Walker protested injustices wherever he could, whether they happened to him or others he saw it as his duty to try and make changes to the system.

A Rearguard Action: Bristol Toryism and the Reform Bill, 1830-32

"During the 1810s and 1820s, the Tory merchant and banker Richard Hart Davis rode high in Bristol electoral politics. Elected as one of the city's two MPs at a bye-election in 1812, he retained his seat at the general election of that year and at subsequent elections in 1818, 1820, 1826 and 1830". John Stevens looks at how Toryism was in the ascendancy, restricting the influence of Whiggism in Bristol.

‘Fiddles, raffles and vociferation’: Looking back at Bristol’s St James’s Fair

St James’s fair in Bristol was a wonderful microcosm of Georgian life. The Georgians were globally aware, acquisitive and had a hearty appetite for entertainment and vice. Madge Dresser and Steve Poole explore different aspects of this social occasion; from trade and entertainment, both local and exotic, to thievery and debauchery. The fair caught the attention of moral reformers who viewed it as an arena symbolic of the cheating and corruption which they so fervently opposed.

Glass Mill, Ashley Vale, 1528-1898 : notes on its history and its contribution to local history – and several outstanding questions

The existence of Glass Mill is still recorded on the street plan of Bristol by a 'mill pond' at the northern, dead, end of Mina Road. Alongside it is now a pumping station which continues to supply water to the city from the brooks which have fed both mill and the town for hundreds of years. Ward discusses its contribution to local history, as well as other relevant questions that have materialised.