Grounds for grave concern: cemeteries and their management in Bristol, past and present

"Not only does death connect human beings across place and time; few other areas of human experience than disposal of the dead are so replete with existential meaning,yet simultaneously quite so prosaic". Helen Frisby and Stuart Prior look at the management of cemeteries in Bristol, as well as reflecting on the Graves Commission, which they were both a part of.

‘In Proud and Loving Remembrance’: The Ashley Down Boys School War Memorial

"The ubiquity of war memorials can lead to them being taken for granted as part of our everyday landscape. Ashley Down Boys School was one of many Bristol schools that memorialised men after the war. The school’s records and the histories of the men who died can be used to examine the motivations behind remembrance, particularly in the decade after the war. By considering the original story of the placing of such a memorial we are able to reconnect to the initial impetus behind such commemorations; the simple desire to remember the sons and brothers lost in the conflict and the need to effect reconciliation with grief so those left behind could carry on with their lives".

A Shining Wedge of Water: The Battle for Bristol’s City Docks, 1969-1975

"One of the things that every civic-minded Bristolian ‘knows’ is that at some point in the 1960s or 70s the City Council planned to cover over or fill in the Floating Harbour". Eugene Byrne sheds light on the effort to save such an important part of the historical landscape in Bristol.

A soldier’s letters

In this article, Williamson describes the process of tracking down the descendants of Stanley Charles Booker in modern day Bristol, a process stemming from a project given to pupils at his school. It covers many of the important processes embarked upon to discover family heritage, especially if technology proves to be unhelpful.

Oldbury Court: The Place and the People

.The Oldbury Court Park and housing estate is situated about 3.5 miles from the centre of the city of Bristol. It has a recorded history dating back to 1086 and the core of the original Domesday land holding has remained remarkably clear of development for over 900 years. Its proximity to Bristol has inevitably meant that throughout its long history it has been intimately connected with the economic and social development of Bristol'. Anthony Nott looks at the events that transpired, and how it has shaped the history of the place.